SPOTLIGHT on #Narrator Craig Jessen: From comics to narration!



Craig Jessen is narrating three books for me.  I think that says it all.  When he auditioned for JAKE'S BRIDE, there was no question that I wanted him to narrate that book and more!  He approached this marriage of convenience novel that has an emotionally tough plotline for the hero with aplomb and sensitivity.  He was Jake.

I can't say enough good things about the way Craig works.  His audio quality is superb.  I never have to be concerned about background noises, or echoes, or anything other than the perfect silence that his voice drops into.  He's professional down to the forms I can use for each chapter to relay my notes to him.  And...I can even print out a spreadsheet with all of them on it.  He's prompt with responses and works steadily.  We completed JAKE'S BRIDE within a month.

So with pleasure and the highest recommendation, I introduce to you Craig Jessen whose interview after a day of editing made me laugh (no easy feat), and I appreciate even more the talents of this narrator.

(Note for authors:  When I first heard Craig's samples on ACX, they were mysteries, thrillers and sci fi.  But it was the quality of his voice that I suspected would be right for romance.  And it was.)

Can you tell me a little about your background and experience thus far?
Growing up, my first experiences performing all had to do with singing.  For some reason (probably bad parenting), my two brothers and I learned just about every song from The Music Man, and performed them at the slightest invitation (again, parenting.) We also sang in a number of choirs, performing every chance we could get.

While I never lost my love of music, I did lost my beautiful boy soprano voice.  There was an uncomfortable period where I tried to pretend I was a tenor, but by the time I realized I was a baritone, my singing days were over.

But before they were, I found my way into theater by way of musical theater, preforming in a community theater production Godspell (stop me if you've heard this story before).

In high school I dove headlong into the craft.  But my interest was much broader than acting.  I enjoyed working on the entire theatrical experience.  After school, I'd work on the sets for as long as they'd let me before rehearsals began, and after rehearsals I'd stay up much later than I should building props (the crowning achievement of which was an animatronic tortoise for Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, that swayed its head and tail from side to side.)  As I began to develop my own voice as an artist, this love for total theater led naturally into playwriting and directing.

After high school, I continued studying theater at Southern Oregon University.  Though my emphasis was in performance (for which I earned a BFA in 2005), the school had an excellent directing and playwriting program, and I continued developing those skills as well.

I got married after college and spent the next two years in New York, where my wife and I worked on a variety of small theater projects together, including a production of N. Richard Nash's "Echoes" in which we played opposite each other as inmates in an asylum (if there is a more fitting metaphor with which to begin a marriage, I haven't found it).

After I'd fully disillusioned my childhood memories from growing up in the Big Apple (fun fact nostalgia blocks out the smell of urine), my wife and I moved back to Oregon, where I was briefly involved in the theater scene before moving to Los Angeles to begin work on a Playwriting MFA at UCLA. In Los Angeles, my theater work has been primarily as a director, helming nine shows since I moved here in 2008.

Why did you decide to begin narrating audiobooks?
When the opportunity arose two years ago to become an audiobook narrator, I dipped my toes in very tentatively.  But as I began to learn the craft, I was amazed at how many of my skills as a theatre artist I could pull over.

As a performer, its tremendously fun to play all the roles in a story.  Sure, it's a lot of work, but how often do you get to seduce yourself? (Well...)

As a director, it brings to bear my skills for pacing, building dramatic tension, and overall storytelling.  And my work as a playwright gives me kind of an inside line when I'm trying to get into an author's head, learning the speech patterns they are writing with, and how they are using language to metabolize thought.

Did you read a lot as a kid?  As an adult? 
This is an extremely embarrassing question to answer.  In school, sure I read everything I was told to.  In third grade, I won the "Top Reader Award" (though the system was flawed--they counted total page numbers and I was reading those abridged classics where every other page is a picture.)

In terms of reading for pleasure, it was not something I did growing up.  Reading was always done by assignment whether by teachers or by parents.  I think I also grew up in a house where there was a stigma against pleasure reading.  Reading was serious business, and my brothers and I were handed weekly assignments from our father in various non-fiction tomes.  (Now to be fair, he also provided us access to 30 years of collected comic books.  But I don't want to get into a lengthy defense of comics, or an even lengthier treatise about my love for them, so suffice it to say that in my head, at that time, this did not count as "reading.")

Yes, I read novels in school but even then it was work, as you read to absorb every minute detail so as to pass those silly reading comprehension tests we're so hell-bent to destroy literature with.  I was 17 before I read a novel strictly for pleasure.  The novel was James Clavell's King Rat, and I remember quite clearly standing in my high school library, seeing the book on a shelf, remembering a story my dad had told about the movie version, and thinking to myself  "I want to read this."

I did.  And I was enthralled.  Freed from the strictures of reading to pass a quiz, I felt immersed in an intimate conversation with the author.  I devoured King Rat, as well as the other six books in Clavell's Asian Saga (for many years, these were the only books I returned to read multiple times, until Neil Gaiman's American Gods joined the repeat hits brigade.)

Since then, I've read voraciously. 

Why narrate a romance?  What other genres are you narrating?
I like narrating romance because it's the genre that comes closest to working on a play.  Much of the book tends to be dialogue, and that's really my favorite thing to do as an actor, wrestling through emotions and ideas with another character.

Of course, there's an added twist--as an audiobook narrator you're playing the other characters, too!  It's an interesting mindset you have to get into like a momentary selective amnesia.  Because each character is trying really hard to get something, but they don't have the full picture--that third person, camera-in-everybody's brain that you get as a reader.  So you have to find ways to compartmentalize your character knowledge, as you go back and forth between them.  Often times you want your characters to be able to surprise each other, which means you have to surprise yourself.

Besides romance, I've narrated science fiction, mystery, horror, inspirational, history, and memoirs. 

What do you like to do most when you're not narrating?
Go on adventures with my wife.

What are you planning next?  
This weekend I'm workshopping my play The End of Sex, which is having a world premiere next year by Theater Vertigo in Portland, Oregon. 

 Craig can be contacted at Craig Jessen's website.




JAKE'S BRIDE on Audible

JAKE'S BRIDE on Amazon

JAKE'S BRIDE on iTunes


©2013 Karen Rose Smith


IN TOUCH with KAREN ROSE SMITH ezine
Karen Rose Smith's romance website 
Karen Rose Smith's mystery website
Karen's Facebook Author Page




Continue >>>

Spotlight on Diane Piron-Gelman, #Narrator for HER SISTER, Women's Fiction, #Family Drama


                                                            Audiobook, HER SISTER

When I went on a search for my narrator for HER SISTER, I knew exactly the type of voice I wanted.  I definitely wanted a female narrator for this novel.  It is women's fiction and the story of three women--a grandmother, a mother, and a daughter.  Not only did I need a women for a narrator, but I wanted someone who could make all three of my female characters sound a bit different so the listener could easily distinguish one from the other.  I thought I might want the impossible.  But then I found Diane Piron-Gelman.  I asked seven women to audition.  From listening to their samples on ACX, I thought they might have the right voice and tone.  But no one did until I heard Diane.  I knew instantly she was the right person to narrate this story.

I've been intrigued by the narrators I have used, how they work, as well as their backgrounds.  So I asked Diane to do this interview with me.  So now I introduce to you Diane Piron-Gelman.

Tell us a little about your background.  Where are you from?

I'm a Chicago area native, born in the city and raised in Evanston, the first suburb to the north.  Chicago is a great city to grow up next to--the lakefront, world-class museums and parks, terrific theater and writers, and of course a highly colorful history including bare-knuckle politics.  With a couple of temporary exceptions--college in Wisconsin, a year abroad in the UK and drama school in Berkley, CA--I've lived in or near Chicago all my life. 

What was your schooling?

I have a BA in English and Theatre from Lawrence University in Appleton, WI, and an MFA certificate from the Berkley branch of the Drama Studio London.

How do you train to become a narrator?

I started out as an actor before doing anything else.  Between high school, college and post-graduate conservatory training at the Drama Studio, I've accumulated more than 30 years years of acting experience, mostly stage.  My conservatory training included voice lessons along with acting, and I've also taken workshops on Shakespeare for actors over the years.  There's nothing like working your way through Shakespeare to sharpen your awareness of spoken language--the sound and weight and shape of it.  The emphasis in the performance classes is all  on how the sounds of the words shape their meaning and emotional impact, cuing actor and audience in on what the characters are going through.

What has been your experience with narrating so far?

HER SISTER is my first audiobook through ACX, with my home studio set-up, and I really enjoyed doing it.  Before that, I recorded two audiobooks at a studio for Libby Fischer Hellman, a terrific Chicago-based writer and a friend and colleague of mine.  Libby was looking for someone to narrate SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE, her 1960's thriller;  she mentioned it at Love is Murder, a mystery conference we were both attending, and I offered to do it.  She had me audition on the spot and liked what she heard, so I ended up reading that one and her next book, A BITTER VEIL, set in Iran during the 1979 Islamic revolution.

What genre do you like to narrate the best?

I love mysteries, of which I read a lot.  I'd also enjoy a chance to read fantasy/SF, another genre I love.  Beyond that, anything that's well-written is appealing to me.  I love the sound of well-crafted prose; it's like music.

Did you read a lot as a kid?  As an adult?

Oh, tons.  I was one of those kids who always had her nose in a book.  I still can't go to sleep at night without a little reading time first--and this in spite of, or maybe because of, my also being a writer and an editor.  Between that and audiobooks, my various jobs require me to read a lot, so it's a good thing I enjoy it so much.

Why did you decide to begin narrating audiobooks?

I've always enjoyed reading out loud, and audiobooks offered a way for me to use my acting skills.  Unfortunately,  there's not a lot of money in theater unless you're extremely lucky...but when I read an audiobook, I get to play all the characters and bring out the full flavor of the language.  And people pay me for this.  What's not to love? 

How do you know what voice to use for each character?

I start with cues from the book itself--whether a character is male or female, how old they are, where they're from, whether they have (or are written with) an identifiable accent.  After that, I go by the kind of person they are. Is a character laid back, or high-strung, or a brisk no-nonsense type? Are they young and innocent, streetwise, optimistic, chatty, reserved?  What profession are they--a cop, a grade-school teacher, a coffee shop waitress, a high-powered lawyer, a politician?

How do you keep your characters straight?

Auditory memory.  I'm blessed to have a good one; I can still recall lines from plays I did back in high school.  I also find that if I think myself into a character's head, the voice I chose naturally comes out of my mouth.  That's the acting part.

Do you feel as if you become the characters as you narrate?   

Oh, definitely!  That's part of the fun of it.  Of course, it can get tricky switching rapidly from one character to another during a stretch of dialogue, and from character to "neutral character" and back.  But I enjoy the challenge.

Do you read the book before you start or narrate scene by scene?

I read the whole book first.  That way I won't miss any information about a character that might not be given the first time they turn up in a scene.  Reading the whole book also gives me a feel for the characters' emotional journeys, which helps me bring out their experience as I read.  I also use that first read to mark cues in the text as to how a particular line should be read:  things like "her voice dropped to a whisper" or "he said through gritted teeth."  If a sound-based description like that is right there, I want to make sure the dialogue it goes with sounds the way the author wants it to.

What is the toughest part of narrating?

One: mouth noises.  You never notice until you read out loud for a stretch how often your mouth either goes dry or builds up too much saliva and you start sounding sloppy.  And the mike picks up everything, so I have to stop recording to swallow or take a swig of water.  Second: getting so caught up in the words and story that I speed up without realizing it.  If you go too fast, you lose clarity for the person listening.

How do you protect your voice?

I have a water bottle nearby for dryness, and I do vocal and breathing warm-ups before I get started.  Breath support is vital for not straining the vocal chords.


What do you look for in an author's history to sway you toward narrating their book?

I look not so much at the author's history as at the work itself.  If I like what I read in the audition script, and/or in the description of a book, I'm likely to try it.  That said, it is nice to see that an author has a track record of being published.

What do you like to do most when you're not narrating?

I read voraciously, and I also like to cook.  I'm never happieir than when trying out a new recipe, especially if I can use my own homegrown veggies and herbs in it.

What are you planning next?

My next audiobook project will hopefully be another of Libby Fischer Hellman's books, the third in her "revolution" trilogy along with SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE and A BITTER VEIL.  I've also just finished a really gripping read, TRY THE MORGUE, for Audible via Bee Audio.  It was my first book for them, and I'm looking forward to whatever they might have up next.  After that, I may finally have time to start recording my own mystery, NO LESS BLOOD (which is out in hardback and as an ebook).

Diane Piron-Gelman's contact information:
Email: wordnrd@earthlink.net
Author website: http://www.dmpirrone.net
Business website: http://www.wordnrd.com


 

©2013 Karen Rose Smith
HER SISTER on Amazon

HER SISTER on ITUNES

IN TOUCH with KAREN ROSE SMITH ezine
Karen Rose Smith's romance website 
Karen Rose Smith's mystery website
Karen's Facebook Author Page









Continue >>>

An Interview With Romance Author Donna Fasano


As you might have noticed, I don't often recommend writers or books on my blog.  Everyone needs to make up their own mind about what they choose to read and I'm not sure my voice in the mix makes a difference.  But...this book is different.  Donna and I wrote for Silhouette Romance in the day, and Donna's books are always quality, satisfying romantic reads that I will recommend.  We are both publishing in the indie world now and Donna's new release RECLAIM MY HEART was a pure pleasure to read.  I love strong heroes and Lucas is that.  I like heroines with flaws and Tyne is that.  I'm drawn toward the Native American heritage and this novel gives me a beautiful glimpse into that.  So here's an interview with Donna Fasano that I hope helps you get to know her a little better.


Donna, what attracted you to writing in the first place?
I came to writing from my love of reading.  While growing up, I lost myself in books in order to escape an unhappy childhood.

What genre are you most comfortable writing?
Romance.  I wrote for Harlequin for 20 years, writing sweet romance (as Donna Clayton) and women's fiction/contemporary romance (under my own name). I have self-published some of my back-list Harlequin books. The Merry-Go-Round was never published by a traditional publisher, so I guess that would be my first indie-published book. Reclaim My Heart is the second of my front-list indie-published book. Reclaim My Heart is the second of my front-list indie-published book. Reclaim My Heart is the second of my front-list indie-published titles.

How has your upbringing influenced your writing?
I think authors who face a lot of pain and anguish seem to write stories with great depth, with honesty and compassion.  It could be that dealing with trauma brings out the best (or worst) in people. I believe that losing my mother at such a young age had a huge impact on me, not just as a writer but as a human being. I became, I don't know, more maternal towards my family, my friends, heck, towards everyone I meet...more giving of myself. I'm not sure. But I know that the loss could have made me bitter and angry. I'm just so grateful that the exact opposite seems to describe me.

Where do you get your inspiration and ideas from?
My mind is always on the alert. I take ideas from everything I see, hear, read, experience. I have been known to take a snippet of conversation overheard in an elevator and turn it into a book (Return of the Runaway Bride), or from a location (His Wife For A While), or from a person I met (Taking Love In Stride). So be careful! If you interact with me, you might end up in one of my novels.

What's your favorite place in the entire world?
I have visited so many beautiful places.  The South of France, the rolling mountains of Italy, the Mediterranean Sea, the cobbled streets of Brussels, the red rocks of Sedona, Arizona, beautiful Morro Bay, California, and I spend lots of time in Ocean City, Maryland.  I obviously can't pick a favorite. Besides, there are so many places waiting to be seen!

What was your favorite part of this book to write? Which part was the hardest?
I really enjoyed writing the love scenes.  In my sweet romances, all the "spice" takes place behind closed doors. So this was very fun. And which part was hardest? The "kitchen love scene" (naughty pun intended!).

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you "grew up"?
I wanted to be a teacher. My aunt attended college and earned her teaching degree. I always idolized her.

If you couldn't be an author, what would your ideal career be?
Teacher. I love kids, and I often include them in my stories.  I always say that children are very honest and outspoken. Kids inject a great deal of fun into a book.

Give your fans three fun facts that they may not already know about you.
I love to cook! (I often post recipes on my blog.)
My reading tastes are crazy-eclectic. I read anything and everything.
I'm a little on the chubby side.

Chocolate, vanilla, or strawberry?
Depends. If we're talking ice cream, then vanilla...and I love mind topped with sliced banana and warm caramel sauce. If we're talking cake, then chocolate and don't forget the fudge frosting. If we're talkilng milkshakes, then strawberry.  Wow, now I'm hungry.

Please tell us in one sentence only, why we should read your book.
I put my heart and soul into RECLAIM MY HEART, and I think it shows...in the characters and in the story.

So what's next for you as an author?  Any last words?
I'm thinking of writing a book that revolves around three friends in different stages of marriage, but I'm not sure yet. I've worked very hard on RECLAIM MY HEART and I'm going to take a few days off. Then I'll get back to work!


Donna Fasano is a three time winner of the HOLT Medallion, a CataRomance Reviewers Choice Award winner for Best Single Title, a Desert Rose Golden Quill Award finalist, and a Golden Heart finalist. Her books have sold over 3.6 million copies worldwide and have been published in nearly two dozen languages. Her books have made the Kindle Top 100 Paid list numerous times, climbing as high as #17.

Book Blurb:
Sixteen years ago, Tyne Whitlock cut all ties to her past and left town under the shameful shadow of a teenage pregnancy. Now her fifteen-year-old son is in trouble with the law and she is desperate for help. BUt reaching out to high-powered attorney Lucas Silver Hawk will tear open the heart-wrenching past in ways Tyne never imagined.

Forced to return to the Delaware Indian community were Lucas was raised, Tyne and Lucas are tempted by the heated passion that consumed them as teens. Tyne rediscovers all the reasons she found this man irresistible, but there are scandalous secrets waiting to be revealed, disgraceful choices made in the past that cannot be denied. Love is a powerful force that could heal them both--if the truth doesn't rip them apart.

Buy Amazon

Buy Barnes and Noble

Buy Kobo

Author Facebook Page

Author on Twitter

Author Website

Goodreads

Pinterest

Continue >>>

WHAT CAN A COVER REVEAL? A new mystery series by Karen Rose Smith



Caprice De Luca is a sleuth with personality!  She's a home-stager and likes to use unique themes for the houses she stages so they sell faster and tempt house hunters from all over to her open houses.  But Caprice herself, at thirty-two is a retro girl.  With her hair style from the 70's, her vintage clothes from the 50's and 60's, and her gravitation toward unique pieces, her home reflects her likes and personality.  My cover for STAGED TO DEATH, the first Caprice De Luca home-stager mystery says it all.

It's like a treasure map that will tell you important details about Caprice and the book.  The colors are so 60's, Caprice's favorite decade.  In her 50's Pennsylvania Cape Cod house, you'll find an overstuffed fuchsia chair in her living room.  If you look closely, you'll see the name of the series on the laptop.  Her cat Sophia--named after her Nana's favorite actress, Sophia Loren--sits atop her turquoise-carpeted cat tree.  Could any cat be happier?  And Caprice's stray dog, Dylan, has decided being friends with Sophia pleases Caprice.

Besides spotlighting that Caprice's favorite colors are fuchsia, turquoise, lime green and yellow, this cover reveals her personality, her vocation for caring for stray animals and her desire to surround herself and her clients with a mood that suits their own lifestyle.

I'm so excited to reveal the STAGED TO DEATH cover to you.  Although December seems to be a long way away, you can preorder the mystery now.

Oh, and did I mention this series will include recipes?  Caprice comes from a large Italian family and likes to cook.

Soon I'll have an excerpt from STAGED TO DEATH on my mystery website.  Stay tuned for more blogs about decorating, cooking, dogs and cats and everything that makes this series unique.

©2013 Karen Rose Smith




IN TOUCH with KAREN ROSE SMITH ezine
Karen Rose Smith's romance website 
Karen Rose Smith's mystery website
Karen's Facebook Author Page


Continue >>>

Zoie's First Birthday









My RESCUING A KITTY blogs have slowed down, it's true.  But that's because Zoie is growing up!  However, I couldn't let her first birthday pass without a blog.  She was born sometime in May, so we can celebrate the whole month!

Zoie took over the house and tried to take domination over London and Ebbie from the beginning.  London quickly put her in her place.  Zoie teases London, plays with her by running up and down the stairs and wrinkling throw rugs in a chase, and sleeps nearby her now and then.  Zoie and Ebbie have an entirely different relationship.  They both spend most of their day with me.  But Zoie likes to know where Ebbie is at all times.  She chases her to a little area I prepared for Ebbie under a window.  Since Ebbie has arthritic back problems, she has a set of steps we developed into a little platform to give her plenty of room to stretch and sleep.  That's where Zoie prefers Ebbie to be!

Zoie has been turning her little nose away from kitten food the past six weeks.  She wants adult cat food.  We feed her Blue canned food in it's many varieties to keep her healthy and her coat sleek.  She has the feline herpes virus and still eats Lysine treats every day.  (Ebbie and London do, too)  I use Eagle dry food mixed with a Wysong brand but limit it for them all.  Zoie is nine and a half pounds now.  It's unbelievable that she was only 1 1/2 pounds when we found her.

In January we had Zoie spayed.  I was apprehensive about the surgery and possible changes in Zoie's personality afterward.  But we had a terrific veterinarian who treated her with respect and compassion.  Zoie came through surgery and aftercare even more affectionate than before.  Visit my blog about Zoie's spaying experience.

Zoie has been a sweetie from the moment I held her.  She likes to be in our presence and still gives us belly laughs frequently with her antics.  We freshened up the bedroom recently with a chenille spread and a kitty quilt my BFF gifted me with.  Zoie had to give the bed her seal of approval!  These photos say it all.  We love her to pieces and she brings us so much joy that I can't imagine our life without her.





©2013 Karen Rose Smith





IN TOUCH with KAREN ROSE SMITH ezine
Karen Rose Smith's romance website 
Karen Rose Smith's mystery website


Continue >>>

Mother's Day Memorial Garden -- How I Remember



Mother's Day is here again.  Spring is rich with memories as well as flowers.  When a mom is gone, the Mother's Day commercials, cards and sentiments are hard to watch.  So for many years, we've tended a Memorial Garden in our yard where lots of my mom's favorite flowers and bushes grow.  We started small at first.  Originally a circular ring surrounded three Canadian Hemlock trees.  We expanded to include spirea bushes which formed a privacy border around the backyard of my childhood home.  In following seasons, I found a statue of a little girl on a bench with a basket for flowers.  We surrounded her with forget-me-nots.  A border of hyacinths bloom with color and fragrance in early spring. 
 

Each year, some aspect of the garden changes.  Bleeding hearts, another of Mom's favorites, have grown tall.  We lost a hemlock and replaced it with an Alaskan cedar.  A yellow rose bush--my mom especially liked yellow roses--produces rose hips and we don't trim it back as much as our other garden roses.  For the past few years, I've been growing flowers from seeds.  In early summer, we plant geraniums I grow and sow zinnia seeds to replace the spring flowers. This year I'm adding Shasta daisies for two reasons. My mom liked them and...  I've named a dog in my second mystery "Shasta" to commemorate that.



Just as life continuously changes, the garden does, too.  Each bush that greens, each flower that sprouts, each blossom that blooms and gives off a glorious scent, brings back memories.  So on Mother's Day, as well as through the summer, I remember and relive a little of my childhood all over again.
 


©2013 Karen Rose Smith



IN TOUCH with KAREN ROSE SMITH ezine
Karen Rose Smith's romance website
Karen Rose Smith's mystery website
Continue >>>

Mother's Day Memorial Garden



Mother's Day is here again.  Spring is rich with memories as well as flowers.  When a mom is gone, the Mother's Day commercials, cards and sentiments are hard to watch.  So for many years, we've tended a Memorial Garden in our yard where lots of my mom's favorite flowers and bushes grow.  We started small at first.  Originally a circular ring surrounded three Canadian Hemlock trees.  We expanded to include spirea bushes which formed a privacy border around the backyard of my childhood home.  In following seasons, I found a statue of a little girl on a bench with a basket for flowers.  We surrounded her with forget-me-nots.  A border of hyacinths bloom with color and fragrance in early spring. 
 

Each year, some aspect of the garden changes.  Bleeding hearts, another of Mom's favorites, have grown tall.  We lost a hemlock and replaced it with an Alaskan cedar.  A yellow rose bush--my mom especially liked yellow roses--produces rose hips and we don't trim it back as much as our other garden roses.  For the past few years, I've been growing flowers from seeds.  In early summer, we plant geraniums I grow and sow zinnia seeds to replace the spring flowers. This year I'm adding Shasta daisies for two reasons. My mom liked them and...  I've named a dog in my second mystery "Shasta" to commemorate that.



Just as life continuously changes, the garden does, too.  Each bush that greens, each flower that sprouts, each blossom that blooms and gives off a glorious scent, brings back memories.  So on Mother's Day, as well as through the summer, I remember and relive a little of my childhood all over again.
 


©2013 Karen Rose Smith



IN TOUCH with KAREN ROSE SMITH ezine
Karen Rose Smith's romance website
Karen Rose Smith's mystery website
Continue >>>